Letter from the Editor

Part-time work can be an attractive option for hospitalists, whether it allows them to spend more time with their families or pursue other professional interests. Our cover story offers tips on where to look for part-time work, caveats to be aware of, and how to get the schedule you want.


Part-time work can be an attractive option for hospitalists, whether it allows them to spend more time with their families or pursue other professional interests. And while employers used to be reluctant to hire part-timers, that trend is changing, experts say. Still, hospitalists seeking part-time positions need to be savvy about finding or even creating the ideal job that will benefit both themselves and their employers. In our cover story, Staff Writer Stacey Butterfield shares tips on where to look for part-time work, caveats to be aware of, and how to get the schedule you want.

If you're looking for a job right now, part-time or otherwise, the troubled economy is something else to consider. As a recent Thomson Reuters analysis found, hospitals are far from immune to the economic downturn: U.S. hospitals had a median profit margin of zero in the third quarter of 2008, and half of those surveyed were unprofitable. Although hospitalists are still in demand, considerations like productivity and retention rather than signing bonuses figure more prominently in job offers. Read Senior Writer Jessica Berthold's story for more on how the economic woes are affecting hospitalist recruitment.

I'd like to take this opportunity to recognize Lisa Kirkland, FACP, one of the members of our editorial advisory board and our Measure of the Month columnist, who was recently named an associate editor of the Journal of Hospital Medicine. Congratulations, Dr. Kirkland!

It's time again to ask for your suggestions for our second annual Top Hospitalists issue. We're looking for the hospitalists who made extraordinary contributions to the field in 2009, whether through cost savings, improved work flow, patient safety, leadership, mentorship or quality improvement, to name just a few examples. Do you know a colleague who might qualify? If so, go to our entry form and tell us who and why.

Last month, our staff was on hand for the latest happenings at ACP's annual meeting, Internal Medicine 2009, held April 23 through 25 in Philadelphia. Look for our special conference section in next month's issue and let us know what you think. As always, you can reach us via email.

Sincerely,
Jennifer Kearney-Strouse
Editor, ACP Hospitalist